Dog Agility Training Is Great Fun And Exercise For Dogs Of All Breeds

Dog agility training is a fun, easy to learn sport that can have many benefits for both you and your dog.

If you’ve ever seen an agility show on TV or attended one in person, you’ve no doubt seen dog and handler teams maneuvering through a series of obstacles, trying to clear them all as quickly and cleanly as possible. This is agility in a nutshell and it is the focus of this site.

Border Collie dog agility training with weave poles
Border Collie dog agility training with weave poles

Here you’ll find a comprehensive resource giving you all the information you could possibly need to bring you into the amazing world of agility dog training. You’ll find sections covering agility equipment such as tunnels, weave poles and teeter-totters; the ins and outs of dog agility classes; the facts you need to know about training; where to find agility trials and lots of information on other dog sports like Frisbee, dock diving, treibball, and lure coursing.

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Before getting into the details, however, let’s start with the basics of dog agility training. What exactly is it and why would anyone be interested in it? As described above, agility is a sport where a handler (that’s you), guides a dog through a series of obstacles. In agility competition, the idea is to navigate the course as quickly as possible without taking any “faults.” Faults can be given for everything from refusing an obstacle altogether (called a refusal or runout) to knocking down jump bars or taking the obstacles in the wrong order.

Any breed of dog can be trained to run an agility course, and any type of handler can participate as well. People of all ages and all physical conditions have worked in agility dog training with great success. That’s one of the best parts of this particular sport. You don’t have to be an Olympic quality athlete to be successful and your dog doesn’t have to be a purebred. In fact, even the AKC will now allow mixed breeds to compete in agility.

Jack Russel Terrier on an agility course.

Cerae / stock.adobe.com

Jack Russel Terrier on an agility course.

Cerae / stock.adobe.com

Dog Agility Training For Mind And Body

That is particularly good news for interested dog owners because there are many benefits to be had from agility training with your dog. Not the least of which is getting a great physical workout for both you and your dog. As you run the course alongside your dog, giving hand and voice commands, you’ll be getting a great cardio workout. And the training is just as good for your dog, helping to exercise both mind and body.

Mind? Yes, that’s right, agility dog training can also help to work out your dog’s brain, and that’s more important than most people realize. That’s because a dog’s natural instinct is to work. While a routine walk is good for the body, it does nothing to challenge your dog, which can lead to boredom and bored dogs may become destructive or disobedient dogs. But challenging them to navigate a series of jumps, climbs, runs and crawls will allow them to flex both their physical and mental muscles.

Just as with any sport you will want to minimize any dog health problems or injuries that could arise. While agility dog training is a healthy and fun activity for you and your dog we want to make sure you stay safe out there. Be aware of potential issues and go at a pace you are both comfortable with.

Border Terrier jumps over an agility hurdle.

JuhaSa / stock.adobe.com

Border Terrier jumps over an agility hurdle.

JuhaSa / stock.adobe.com

Create A Better Bond With Agility Dog Training

At the same time, dog agility training helps to form a better bond between dog and owner. Because the two of you have to work so closely together, your dog will learn to depend on you and trust you, seeing you as a partner rather than just someone to provide food and water on a regular basis. In the long run, you’ll find that agility training makes for a better dog/owner relationship and a stronger bond. What’s not to love about that?

So check out the rest of the site and find out all the information you need to know about dog agility training. Before you know it, you and your best friend will be scaling new heights together!

 

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